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Tusse wins Melodifestivalen

Tusse has won Melodifestivalen 2021 and thus will represent Sweden in the Eurovision Song Contest with the song “Voices”. The song is wirtten and composed by Joy and Linnea Debb, Jimmy Thörnfeldt and Anton Wrethov. Tusse was the favourite of both expert jury and televoters.

The full result of Melodifestivalen 2021 is:

  1. Tusse, “Voices”, 175 pts
  2. Eric Saade, “Every minute”, 118 pts
  3. The Mammas, “In the middle”, 106 pts
  4. Dotter, “Little Tot”, 105 pts
  5. Clara Klingenström, “Behöver inte dig idag”, 91 pts
  6. Klara Hammarström, “Beat of broken hearts”, 79 pts
  7. Danny Saucedo, “Dandi dansa”, 74 pts
  8. Charlotte Perrelli, “Still young”, 60 pts
  9. Arvingarna, “Tänker inte alls gå hem”, 44 pts
  10. Alvaro Estrella, “Baila baila”, 26 pts
  11. Anton Ewald, “New religion”, 25 pts
  12. Paul Rey, “The missing piece”, 25 pts

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